reuse

Guest Blogger #3: Siobhan Dodds

Guest blogger #3: We've asked artist and thinker Siobhan Dodds to speak about her experience cleaning up Australia on Clean Up Australia Day over the last 20 years. 

By Siobhan Dodds

Growing up on the Mornington Peninsula meant that every Clean Up Australia day was spent at the beach. From as young as 5 years old, I was beginning to understand the importance of human intervention against environmental degradation. In the lead up to Clean Up Australia Day, we would sit around and learn about marine habitats, different species, flora, fauna and their reliance on a healthy ecosystem. Bottles, cans, plastics, sharps and waste became a signpost of an infected habitat.

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As most people who grew up beside a beach will tell you, this playground is sacred and worth preserving. Not only does it provide endless playtime, but it links us directly to the sea and its marine life. Anyone that has visited over summer knows how important these environments are for leisure and family time. Clean Up Australia Day taught me from a young age that in order to protect the marine life and to protect our beaches, we need to keep it clean.

Since finishing school and moving across different parts of Melbourne, I’ve noticed that a lot of people are still confused when it comes to rubbish disposal, especially recycling. Perhaps they never had a year in year out Clean Up Australia experience like I did. Or perhaps they’re ill educated on cause and effect. This is why I think the alliance built between Clean Up Australia and Sustain Me Group could not be more perfect. People who missed out on learning about conservation and the importance of our environments through the Clean Up Australia day event can now access the app to learn and develop their understanding whenever they want.

Sustain Me brings council specific recycling and waste management education to you in an easy format, an app. For most people, finding information is usually laborious, ineffective and inaccurate. The Sustain Me Team have collated the information and partnered with Clean Up Australia to help increase the amount of recycling on Clean Up Australia Day and beyond. While dedicating one day and participating on Clean Up Australia Day is an important first step, we need to be vigilant of our waste and recycling practices every day and continually act to reduce the impact of our habits.

Despite learning this and participating in over twenty Clean Up Days, I still see rubbish on our beaches. This makes me feel really disappointed, especially because it is a human centric problem. What does encourages me though is that there are organisations out there willing to make our lives easier and in doing so, they commit their time and effort to ensuring change in a big way. All we have to do is learn more, show up, become active and participate.

This year, on March 6th, I will once again sign up, and contribute to Clean Up Australia Day. I will also download the Sustain Me App from the Google Play or App stores for free. I will continue to separate my collected rubbish into recycling and waste streams as I want to continue to live and have access to beautiful environments and leave it in a pristine condition for future generations.

rubbish sandcastles caused by not using sustain me

Why recycle?

Recycling isn't sexy. We've been told for decades now that we should recycle, we've been given countless different instructions, we've been told throughout school to 'Do The Right Thing'. But. These quick slogans lack a tad of depth. We come away knowing we ought to recycle, but not necessarily why.

I first started thinking strongly about recycling because it was a way to reuse your waste, reduce demand on natural resources and - I mean - if we can use what we've already got, then we can reduce our consumption, right? Right.

But that sounds a bit boring.

And I've always found that the most difficult question. Preserving the environment will allow for the preservation of the human race. But that is so abstract and dramatic, that it feels a tad out of place.

We've filmed for our crowdfunding campaign (that's set to be launched really very soon) and in it, I have to give a little spiel about why recycling matters. What does it mean for people in the real world?

Also, having been working in this space for a while now, I've met my share of climate skeptics. I don't want to come across as airy-fairy - I want to make sense and give real examples of why this all matters.

Also, being stared at by the camera is really demanding. It's like: 'Say something good - now! Make it so good so that we can hit our fundraising goal!' So, pressure.

In my head, it was like a thousand thoughts and emotions were popping up at the same time. And out of this, an explosion of my own personal reality. (I won't say what I eventually said on the crowdfunding campaign clip, I won't ruin the surprise.)

The reason I recycle is because:

- I can't sleep at night knowing that I willfully live in a manner that harms the environment.

- I love my friends, family and I want them to have a temperate planet to live on.

- I love trees and plants and am disheartened, heart broken, knowing that climate change is making it difficult for many species to survive.

- I actually do panic every time I hear the amount of extinctions of animals that has happened over my life time.

- Because while I am captivated and mystified by the environment, I am also petrified. Because it is, and always will be, stronger and bigger than me.

 

What do you think? Convincing?

 

All that aside, happy new year and welcome to 2016. A year in which I have already turned another age, got a cat and written at least a blog post. 

 

Peace x

Day 3 of 25 Days of Waste

To celebrate our 3rd day of the 25 Days of Waste, I am thinking about bags. Bags, bags, bags.

The whole reason why this blog post came about is because I Google searched for an open-licensed image comparing calico bags and plastic bags in some way. There weren't any. 

But then I got hooked reading up about all these cool, sustainable options for Christmas shopping. Finding out about new ways to reduce my impact on the earth really does make me feel all warm inside. A bit like Christmas. 

Anyway. So I thought I'd do a post-collage of the fruits of my research. Here it is. 

5 WAYS TO AVOID NEEDING A PLASTIC BAG THIS CHRISTMAS

1. Make yourself a calico-style bag out of your old T-shirt. This no-nonsense clip will show you how.  

2. Put a little bag inside your usual hand-bag, or your car, or your pocket. Make a commitment to yourself not to leave the house without this.

3.  Decide to yourself that you will not take a plastic bag to carry home your shopping for the rest of the year.

4. Do a Kris Kringle and buy fewer gifts so as to reduce your need for a bag. 

5. Ask yourself: "What would work? What would be effective in helping me refuse plastic bags at the shops?" When you have an answer, do that.

And that, my friends, brings home our 3/25 Days of Waste for this festive season.