recycling

Why recycle?

Recycling isn't sexy. We've been told for decades now that we should recycle, we've been given countless different instructions, we've been told throughout school to 'Do The Right Thing'. But. These quick slogans lack a tad of depth. We come away knowing we ought to recycle, but not necessarily why.

I first started thinking strongly about recycling because it was a way to reuse your waste, reduce demand on natural resources and - I mean - if we can use what we've already got, then we can reduce our consumption, right? Right.

But that sounds a bit boring.

And I've always found that the most difficult question. Preserving the environment will allow for the preservation of the human race. But that is so abstract and dramatic, that it feels a tad out of place.

We've filmed for our crowdfunding campaign (that's set to be launched really very soon) and in it, I have to give a little spiel about why recycling matters. What does it mean for people in the real world?

Also, having been working in this space for a while now, I've met my share of climate skeptics. I don't want to come across as airy-fairy - I want to make sense and give real examples of why this all matters.

Also, being stared at by the camera is really demanding. It's like: 'Say something good - now! Make it so good so that we can hit our fundraising goal!' So, pressure.

In my head, it was like a thousand thoughts and emotions were popping up at the same time. And out of this, an explosion of my own personal reality. (I won't say what I eventually said on the crowdfunding campaign clip, I won't ruin the surprise.)

The reason I recycle is because:

- I can't sleep at night knowing that I willfully live in a manner that harms the environment.

- I love my friends, family and I want them to have a temperate planet to live on.

- I love trees and plants and am disheartened, heart broken, knowing that climate change is making it difficult for many species to survive.

- I actually do panic every time I hear the amount of extinctions of animals that has happened over my life time.

- Because while I am captivated and mystified by the environment, I am also petrified. Because it is, and always will be, stronger and bigger than me.

 

What do you think? Convincing?

 

All that aside, happy new year and welcome to 2016. A year in which I have already turned another age, got a cat and written at least a blog post. 

 

Peace x

Day 3 of 25 Days of Waste

To celebrate our 3rd day of the 25 Days of Waste, I am thinking about bags. Bags, bags, bags.

The whole reason why this blog post came about is because I Google searched for an open-licensed image comparing calico bags and plastic bags in some way. There weren't any. 

But then I got hooked reading up about all these cool, sustainable options for Christmas shopping. Finding out about new ways to reduce my impact on the earth really does make me feel all warm inside. A bit like Christmas. 

Anyway. So I thought I'd do a post-collage of the fruits of my research. Here it is. 

5 WAYS TO AVOID NEEDING A PLASTIC BAG THIS CHRISTMAS

1. Make yourself a calico-style bag out of your old T-shirt. This no-nonsense clip will show you how.  

2. Put a little bag inside your usual hand-bag, or your car, or your pocket. Make a commitment to yourself not to leave the house without this.

3.  Decide to yourself that you will not take a plastic bag to carry home your shopping for the rest of the year.

4. Do a Kris Kringle and buy fewer gifts so as to reduce your need for a bag. 

5. Ask yourself: "What would work? What would be effective in helping me refuse plastic bags at the shops?" When you have an answer, do that.

And that, my friends, brings home our 3/25 Days of Waste for this festive season. 

Sustain Me shortlisted for Banksia Sustainability Awards

Sustain Me Grouphas been shortlisted for the Banksia Sustainability Awards, Smart Technology. 

I am so excited. 

Yesterday, I ran 35km because I am training for a marathon next week. And this is relevant because my legs hurt a whole heap - walking down stairs is a real struggle. Well, I forgot about my hip flexes when I got this news. I jumped up and down like it's nobody's business. (They're beginning to hurt again now). 

What this means is that we have been assessed by a panel of expert judges to determine organisations that show

"...demonstrated leadership and innovation in the development and application of technology, which directly promotes a more sustainable world" Banksia Foundation Press Release 08.10.2015

It is an award that recognises leaders in sustainability efforts, across numerous categories, all over Australia. 

That's right. We are sustainability leaders in Australia. This is a big deal. We're being recognised. 

I am so excited. 

Winners are announced in November.

Sustain Me mentioned in Huffington Post

Just a quick post today. Here are some general updates:

                  1. We are speaking with a cool local business that offers you rewards for recycling.                           More on this later.

                  2. We will be launching with some councils' mayors in November. More on this later.

                  3. I recycled my soft plastics at the supermarket today. 

                  4. The stickers on my kerbside recycling bins are peeling off but that's ok because                            the ink's faded anyway.

                  5. The Sustain Me app is pretty cool and worth downloading. 

                  6. We got a mention on Huffington Post this week. 

Last week a number of people replied to the Action and Inaction post - I wanted to shout out to you to say thanks! It's brilliant getting replies and I really appreciate it. Thank you :) 

Ok, I'll now spend my next few days thinking about something better to write.

I hope you have a nice day!

Action and inaction

I was speaking with a friend this week and explaining how much I was affected by learning about landfill-decomposing times. I told her that I just couldn't believe that I had contributed to soft plastics, glass, metal going to landfill. I had done so in ignorance - I didn't know how much of an issue this was. 

For example, I only just learnt that in Australia we only have landfills secured on average for the next 15 years. After this, garbage trucks will have to travel hundreds of kilometres out of the city to dispose of our waste. And in addition, landfill carbon emissions account for 3% of all of Australia's carbon emissions. 

Yeah. 

So we can make a sizeable difference by reducing what we send to landfill. 

Between my recycling bin, my soft plastics recycling bin and my worm farm, not much goes to landfill. I must look up whether or not carbon emissions are released from worm farms. 

Anyway. 

Back to my friend. I was telling her my worries and she asked me the most brilliant question: "Oh ok, so what have you done then to change your behaviour?" 

Action. Don't just talk about it. Do action. 

And I am doing action. The soft-plastics recycling bin (i.e. a plastic bags of plastic bags, bread bags and other soft plastics that I drop off at the supermarket where they turn them into seats for parks and sea-side walkways) is new. I have also been seriously looking into buying bulk. A friend of mine has a flour maker (i.e. a machine that crushes up wheat and spits out flour). And I've also been thinking about making my own bread, tomato sauce, that kind of thing. I haven't decided which are worth the time and effort from my view yet, I suppose future Eleanor will figure that out. 

I have an action request from you: if you read these emails/ blogs but haven't download the app, or don't use the app - can I ask a question? Why? What is it that keeps you from using the app? Feedback from you is the most important of all. So you're only helping by telling. 

Thanks! :) 

p.s. In other news, we applied for the Banksia Sustainability Awards today. I spent the last week writing the 2,000 word report. Up until last night, it was 3,000 words.

Dear Wonderful Supporter, Thank you

You'll know by now that we had created a form on our website, this website (haha) that allowed people to pre-register for the app if they wanted to. Well, I just emailed everyone who had pre-registered before the release of the app. In the process of writing that email, I realised something. It really was a wonderful realisation. And I just had to tell someone about it. So, naturally, I wrote about it in the pre-registers email, and I'm writing it here for yourself, as well.

Let me tell you a story: I am emailing you from my personal email account and not from Mail Chimp because I think a lot of the emails I've been sending out have been going to the spam box. As a consequence, I had to format each email address (and there a couple of hundred of people I'm sending this email to, including YOU!) What this meant was I had to go through and put a comma next to each email address. At first, I was devastated when I realised how much work was involved. I had to make myself an extra coffee, and put a candle on, just to motivate myself to do it. But then, as I started going through all the emails, I startedreading the email addresses. I realised just how many friends have pre-registered to download the app. I realised just how manysupporters. It was the most beautiful story of friendship and support that was unfurling in front of me. 

Thank you from the bottom of my heart for supporting me and Stephen to create this recycling app. 

I've recently come back from an inspirational week away, where creative and new ideas around communicating new projects were discussed. Amanda Palmer's Art of Asking TEDTalk offers one such idea: that people want to help, but it's your job to communicate what that help looks like. 

In spirit of this, if you do want to help us further, there are two clear actions you could take. Firstly, tell people about us. You could forward this email to three friends, you could text them the link to Google Play or the App Store, or you could discuss it over dinner tonight. Secondly, we are about to start a crowdfunding campaign and would love to hear your advise on how we should best go about this. If you don't have advise, but you do have a couple of bucks, then get them ready and we'll notify you when it's time. 

For me, the game just changed. We are no longer creating a recycling app; we have created a recycling app. Now it's all about getting it to the people. I'll be blogging about this and what ever randomly goes through my head here

Thank you, thank you, thank you, 

Eleanor and Stephen

Thank you for your support, now's for celebration! 

Quick, before it's out: What you want to see in the app?

The app is nearly ready to be released. 

There has been struggles. There has been heartbreak. There has been joy. And soon there will be a Sustain Me recycling app on Google Play and the Apple Store. 

That's right, folks. Snap. 

We have had a very big week, with agreements being formed with two major agencies (to be announced soon). And in celebration, we'd like to reach out and offer something back. 

What do you want to see in the app? Do you really just need to know about plastic bags? Or maybe a couch is a thorn in your side? Have you ever tried to recycle a bike lock? (I have). Well, tell us!

Tell us through:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/sustainmerecycling 

Twitter: @SustainMeGroup

Carrier Pigeon:

Carrier Pigeon.

Carrier Pigeon.

Your message could read something like this:

                        Hi Elle, 

                       It's Lucy Sky here, I'd really like to know how to recycle kaleidoscopes, please.

                       Thanks! Peace out. 

You know, just an idea. 

Anyway, let's hear from you now and we'll make sure it is in the app! 

Until then:

(The images in this blog post were sought from Pinterest). Cheers. 

The quiet before the storm

As a child, I have always had a love for that saying: "the quiet before the storm". There is something about how it draws your attention towards, not the storm, but the storm's contrast. The quiet. This serves to define what the storm is not. The storm is not quiet, it is not still, it is not yet imminent. 

[Tangent: I just spent the last 5 minutes disputing with myself whether imminent was what I wanted to say there. I just looked up the definition of imminent: It means "About to happen" or "overhanging". In either case, the quiet before the storm implies 'the quiet' is happening while 'the storm' is definitely not yet happening. In both cases, imminent refers to the storm as "about to happen" and "overhanging" and in neither case can the quiet be described as that. So that was the wrong word.]

Today, right now, 8am on Saturday morning, is the quiet before the storm. I have to go away for the next 5 days for a course I am taking and while I am away learning things, the Sustain Me app will be released. 

4 days from now. 

It will be a different world when I am back. It will be a world in which you can download this recycling app I've been talking about with earnest for the last 2 years. 

Behind-the-scenes, we've had some interesting turns of late. For those who have never uploaded an app to the Apple store, Apple has a vetting process. So someone who works for Apple will actually play with your app to see if it's something they want on their store. Pretty simple. Problem is, is it takes a period of 5 days for them to do this. So for the app to be released by the 29th, someone at Apple needs to say yes to our app before then. And, actually, you needed to be registered and organised and got going this whole process about 2 weeks ago. Which we have. Well, when I say we, I mean Stephen. (Thanks Stephen). But we're little. There are just 2 of us. Apple is big. Apple might just prioritise all companies beginning with A this week, and we'll have to wait. There would be nothing we can do about it. 

So, while we are in the quiet, the storm is indeed, overhanging.

We fight over plastic bags.

My boyfriend, Laurence, and I agree on a great many things sustainable. We agree on all the good reasons we should take the train to work; we agree on the problems with eating meat, with buying from supermarkets, and so on. We aren't ideologically opposed. It's just one of us - I won't say who - is a little more, let's say, pro-active about sustainability than the other. 

Imagine supermarket check-outs, imagine shiny floors and packaged goods. Imagine the odd loose lemon: everything piled high in our supermarket basket. It all begins with a question:

"Should we get a plastic bag?"

"No, we don't need one". Comes the reply.

"Really? There's too much here to carry"

"It's fine, look: I've picked up everything now anyway. Can you grab the milk?; and we're done". 

 

I lost the argument the other day when we had gone shopping right before I was getting on the train to the city. 

"We're going to need a plastic bag". 

"You know what I think about single-use plastics," I say jokingly, not really thinking about it. "Look, it's fine." I flexed my dexterous fingers. "I got this". 

"How am I going to get it all up the stairs?"

"I'll help - ..." My eyes shot to the left, like they do when I've just realised something. "Oh."

Laurence picks up the plastic bag, triumphant. "Thank-you-very-much". Never before has a plastic bag been so cherished. 

That is, until we used it as a bin liner. (Couldn't resist, sorry Sweetheart).

 

I read a blog a little while ago that said "Break Ups on the Rise: Over Tissues". Apparently, according to this blog, people are reporting breaking up over trivial sustainability measures, such as whether or not to recycle tissues. Looking at Laurence's and my supermarket routine, I can see how the regular, everyday-demands of living sustainably in a non-sustainable culture can be heavy demands indeed. Especially if one partner is really pushing it more than the other. This is a source of tension among families, I'm sure, and among friends. The relationship space is not immune. 

In my view it is the good old not-seeing-the-forest-for-the-trees syndrome; people can get caught up over trivialities like recycling tissues and the odd single use plastic bag without recognising that, as a society, we live in a unsustainable way. We are raised to consume heaps, buy more, buy bigger. We are guilty about the rotting food in the fridge, but too busy to do anything about it. Broadly speaking there are large changes we need to make in our lives to help us be more sustainable. In Laurence's and my own situation above, we've actually tried to not shop at the supermarket at all, and have a CERES food box delivered to our house. This forgoes the need for plastic bags (it's delivered in a cardboard box that we recycle in our kerbside recycling bin); and the food is locally sourced. Going even broader, it would be great if Victoria went plastic bag free like SA, NT, NSW and Tassie. (According to this blog, Queensland is committed to being the next). So, government leadership would be great. Right about now.... :/ 

Failing that, there are some useful sustainability initiatives popping out of the ground like daisies in spring time. Take One Step, run through Greensteps at Monash University, encourages people to think up one thing they can do that lessens their impact on the earth, and the program then encourages people to then act out these steps. Similarly, Climate For Change seeks to create a climate for change in Australia's politics-scape; they (also) help you identify and then act on achievable actions that help us unite to create a social mandate our leaders can't ignore and thereby bring about good action on climate change. 

Here are a few ideas about how we can avoid the matrimonial warnings not worth ignoring about plastic bags and all things sustainability. 

 

EDIT: Laurence has just googled whether or not you can recycle tissues. Answer: yes if unsoiled. Compost it (or worm farm) if it is soiled.

29 to go

It is with joy and happiness that I write to you today. Yes, we have a launch date for the app. We will launch it on the Google Play and the App Store on the 29th of July. We have a launch date for the app…!

What the hell? It has taken such a long time to get to this point, and one thing we’ve definitely learnt is to not mind the odd set back or two. And here we are, 4 weeks out from launch.

Between you, me and the fencepost, I have been so anxious about setting a date. What if, what if! But here it is, the date! The 29th of July. 4 weeks from today. Come good, bad or evil, the app will be here.

So what the hell happened? Well, we’ve been working quite a lot since the start of the year to finalise the production of the app and we have finally got the go-ahead from our app developer, the wonderful Alex Portlock, that the app is about to be ready for release. There’s been a lot of managing and juggling different tasks and deadlines behind the scenes, and so it has been very difficult to put a date on release. Indeed, my family has pointed out more than once that the app has been ‘almost ready for release’ for a little while now. For someone like me – always impatient to just get on with the job – waiting has been a hard process. But I am content with the knowledge that we’ve done what we can to produce the best app we can. 

It’s going to be in your hands so very soon.

29 days. Go.

Recycling in Bangladesh

It has been quiet here for a while. Verrrry quiet. If you lean in, I'll tell you why. ... I went away to Bangladesh. 

The story goes: I met a Bangladeshi friend in one of my first years at university and we become quite close. At one point, she invited me to go to Bangladesh with her and some other friends. Appreciative, but poor, I promised her that I would definitely go one day and so we agreed that I would go to Bangladesh for her wedding. That's right. She is now married. And I went to her wedding. 

I also chucked in a side trip to Thailand and speak to you now as a slightly different person. 

One of the things I learnt about most on my trip was culture. Of course I learnt about the Bangladeshi and Thai cultures, but also about my own culture. How to discern it, how to recognise it; I found it in a few spots I didn't expect. Indeed, I came up with the idea for this blog post in a CNG (compressed natural gas - a name given to small, green taxi-like things that I'd call cars if they were anyway near the size, speed or likeness. Heck, I'd call them cars if they had seatbelts), while in the middle of the WORST traffic I'd even been in, having completely surrendered to it. And that idea was around culture. 

You see, these CNGs, they didn't have windows. They had metal-grate doors that closed, but are a bit like chicken-wire in that you are still exposed to the elements. On one hot, sticky day after we had had a tour of old Dhaka, we bought ice creams and shared them with our CNG driver and tour-guide. We sat, quiet and still, in the "car" while we ate them and upon completion the two locals plopped their wrappers through the metal grate and out onto the ground. Just like that. No questions asked. An immediate disposal. A product of Australia and of my generation, I held my wrapper in my hand. I was not going to litter. The driver, having realised the wrapper in my hand, gestured that I plop my wrapper outside also. Well, needless to say, I didn't. What happened to that wrapper after I put it in the bin in my room that night, I'll never know. But it wouldn't surprise me if my efforts simply delayed the process of it ending up on the ground somewhere. 

Because, the thing is, if there is no rubbish service then there is no where to put your rubbish. If you put it in your bin at home, then it will just keep piling up. If you don't want it in your house, you can put it outside, put it where ever you like. It doesn't matter. Because unless someone collects it, or unless you take it to a tip or transfer station, it won't go anyway. So you might as well just leave it anywhere. You might as well plop it out on the road. 

Picture this image. There is a cosy-looking, run-down shack sitting to the side of a plot of land. Trees and chickens surround. The weatherboards are painted eclectic colours so that an artist would appreciate its aesthetic. And outside, just near the house, presumably somewhere near the kitchen, there is a great big pile. A great big pile of rubbish that falls down the hill. The chickens peck through it. This was a common enough image throughout both Bangladesh and Thailand, and very likely many other parts of the world where there is no comprehensive rubbish collection service. But this particular house, with its trees and weatherboards, is painted here for you from the memory of my visit to the Botanical Gardens in Dhaka. This house was the park ranger's house. 

So when I talk about recycling in Bangladesh, I talk about wastage and rubbish and the absence of infrastructure that could service the needs of the people. I talk about cultures that grow around these services and I talk about how that makes me feel. It makes me reflect at how outrageously effective the Australian Government has been to prevent littering and promote recycling. It makes me appreciate that the services exist for me to be environmentally responsible. 

When I talk about recycling in Bangladesh, I talk about a conversation I had with a Bangladeshi there, in Dhaka. A conversation about recycling in Australia. And it made me realise that if there ever was a bunch of like-minded, well-meaning people who had the capacity to reduce their waste entirely, it was going to be us, Australia. 

Yes, it'll be hard to recycle more and reduce our waste. But it's not going to be that hard. 

Join the movement. Deny the concept of waste. 

23.02.2015

Eleanor's Plastic Free Day

I trialed the Plastic Free Day campaign ahead of Saturday's official #plasticfreeday, hosted by the Foundation for Young Australians. The idea around the campaign is to encourage people to think about how much plastic we consume. The suggestion isn't that we should all give up plastic entirely (though I have heard of people who get metal containers and refill their hair shampoo into these containers from source). The suggestion is that we consume a lot of plastic for single use. It's surprising how much. Here's my story. 

My self-imposed restriction on plastic was really apparent as I was grooming myself in the morning. I couldn't use my shampoo, my bodywash, my toothbrush, my deodorant. My sunglasses had to be left at home. Luckily my perfume bottle was not made of plastic, so I was able to leave the house smelling reasonably ok. 

Beyond the potential for BO, the worst was my phone. I have a Samsung Galaxy, and parts of the casing are made from plastic. I couldn't use my mobile phone....!

Having left the house, I knew I couldn't drive my car given the amount of plastic used in that thing. Instead, I took my bike and rode to the train. Because I rode my bike that day, I also took a backpack, instead of the usual handbag. 

The day's events were slightly unusual and given this, I had not choice but to use plastic. You see, I was signing a house lease that day and I had forgotten to acquire a metal pen. I had to use a plastic pen to sign on the dotted line. 

But other than that, once I had left my house it was pretty easy to avoid plastic. I ate sit-in Japanese for lunch, and was not required to use plastic to eat it, (but of course the ingredients that went into that sushi would have at one stage been packaged in plastic). I ensured I had a sit-in coffee. I rued being without my phone. 

But, you see, I failed.

Even as I was trying to actively avoid plastic, it surrounded my every activity. I mentioned I took public transport - my myki is made of plastic. I mentioned I purchased lunch - with plastic-coated money. In celebration of signing our new lease, my partner and I went to have a coffee.

ha. Woops.

ha. Woops.

We got take-away. (When I realised, as I walked away from the cafe, that I had just willingly accepted a plastic, single use, take-away coffee cup, I cussed. Loudly.) 

I also mentioned above that I took my bike, and backpack, both of which I later realised were in part made of plastic. My helmet was also made of plastic. I was switched on enough to brush my teeth without my toothbrush (awkward, make-do finger brushing was poorly attempted). But I was completely oblivious to the fact that the toothpaste tube is made of, you got it, plastic! 

Damn. That plastic stuff. It is a very versatile product. It's everywhere. It even coats the Fredo Frogs that I am currently eating. It comes in so many different forms and sizes, how might we know just how to dispose of this all sustainably?

Pre-register for the Sustain Me app, and find out. 

17.12.2014

Photo-shoot.

This morning I was late to a meeting because I was straightening my hair. Where was I going that required my hair being straightened? We were having a a photo-shoot. That'll be a first for Sustain Me. 

In truth, we sat in the newspaper's Board Room and tried to look seriously at our phones while being photographed, but photo-shoot it still was. 

This is just such a fantastic and gratifying experience. The first thing the journalist said as we sat down was that it's a great story. Our app really is an example where everyone wins: we recycle more, we make less mistakes and so we contaminate our recycling less, councils have more they can recycle, we reduce Melbourne's carbon footprint. Everyone wins. But on top of that, getting to print media is a fantastic opportunity for us to get more awareness in the community, more people will register to download the app early, which for the app to be successful, we need. It just feels so incredible for this project to grow legs like this. 

And, in case you were wondering, a post of said photo from photo shoot will be a-making an appearance on this page. he he! 

When you take recycling and food out of your rubbish bin, what do you have left?

I, like many young people my age, rent. In the last 8 years, I've lived in 7 different places. These ranged in a variety of ways: I lived for two years in uni college, I have rented my fair share of rental houses, I have rented apartments, and one house. Next January I'll be moving again. Why? Being from country Victoria, I think it is my expensive and inconvenient way of seeing and knowing Melbourne. I get to know Melbourne living in one street at a time. But because I move a lot, I can't have or grow a garden. It's very sad. But what I do have is a very fun pot-plant veggie garden.

It was mainly Jamie Oliver who got me into it. To continue the theme in form of analogy, Jamie Oliver planted the seed in my mind to want to have a pot-plant veggie garden in my early teens. Well, in particular, I wanted to live in an artsy London flat that overlooks a neat side walk, with a window that you heave open, framed by a quaint little box of parsley, coriander, mint, rosemary, thyme.... I never knew what he grew. I just wanted me some. 

Instead of the London gig, I live in Melbourne. And instead of a window box of herbs, I have a few pots. As Jamie would say, this is a cheap and sustainable alternative to buying bunches of herbs and veggies in the supermarket that we then throw in the bin, wasted. 

But what does my veggie patch eat!? Well, these wonderful plants need to be fed. And to feed them, I have a worm farm. That's right, I am the proud owner of 1,200 wriggly worms. I had to get over my aversion to them, quick smart. But now I pick them up with my fingers and everything. 

It was a bit tricky at first - they didn't seem to eat very much. They don't like citrus, and don't even think about putting an onion in there. We also had some visitors, little white wriggly worms, which turned out to be the spawn of some devil bug. But I got rid of them. They were numerous, but I was powerful. I had also underestimated the importance of somethings; for example, I didn't consider things like acidity, or how wormies eat (they eat dirt and then sieve the good stuff out, cool, hey?). But I got the hang of it. And now I use what they digest to feed my pot-plant veggie garden. 

Given that I am building a recycling app, I am also very conscious of what we throw out. Everything that could possibly be recycled, is. As we don't put food scraps in the bin either, very little goes to landfill via our garbage bin.  

So, when you take recycling and food out of your rubbish bin, what do you have left? Very little. 

Join the movement, deny the concept of waste. 

And so, this is how the story began

So. A blog, hey? Well, we realised the other day that, as well as an app, we are making a story as we go and it struck us that we could tell it to you.

Imagine this scene. Stephen and I are sitting in a meeting room, in a council building somewhere, talking about our app to council people. Stephen has just explained about bottom lines, and recyclable items going to landfill, wasted recycling opportunities, and so on; at one point, someone asks us why are we doing this. 

Stephen then turns to me and says, 'Elle, you're on'. And I say:

'Well, the reason we are doing this is because we entered a competition in middle of 2013 called the Oxfam-Monash Innovators. The ideas of this competition was to get students to innovate good ideas that address a social issue, and we picked recycling and sustainable living, and we picked a mobile app as the platform. And, well, we won! We won money and support and looked at each other and realised the need to define ourselves. We had to actually do this now. It felt like responsibility. And anyway, did you know that if you put recyclable items in a plastic bag and that bag in your recycling bin, that stuff is not actually recycled. They throw that out.' As council people who work in recycling, funnily enough they did know that. 'But people still do that because they don't know their efforts are wasted.' Pun intended. So, that's why we are doing this. 

But for us the story is also about a project that has blown our expectations. I remember when I heard about the original Oxfam-Monash competition we signed up for. I was sitting at my desk, working on my Masters thesis, and my friend said 'Hey, you should sign up'. And I thought that I didn't want to, but my friend's cool and she was doing it, and it would look good on my resume. Plus I wasn't going to win; it was unlikely and I didn't want to because I had to finish my Masters, and I wasn't sure I had the time. In the end, my friend didn't do it and I won and I still had to do my thesis. So, safe to say my expectations were very quickly blown. 

But the other day, Stephen and I were planning some thing we were planning, and I looked down onto my notes and realised that I had written three names next to questions we had. These contacts would give us the answers we needed. 6 months ago, we didn't know those people. 12 months ago we didn't know anyone. At some point along the line, we became, like, the real-deal. Legit. Da-amn. 

And so, this is how the story began.